Tag Archives: handmade present

Three quilt blocks with fabric strips video tutorial

I like playing with fabric strips. There are so many ideas out there to try out. Check out these three:

 

My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

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3 modern blocks with fabric strips video tutorial

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Beeswax wraps

Beeswax wraps

These beeswax wraps have been around for a while and they use different ingredients.

I’m sticking to the two basic ingredients: beeswax and jojoba oil.

1. Grate the beexwax or use small pellets

2. Place a piece of oven paper on a tray or plate. Then place the fabric right side up on top of it and sprinkle with jojoba oil and a layer of beeswax.

3. Ensure the edges and corners have enough beeswax, but don’t worry. You can always add more later.

4. Place the tray in the oven for 10-15 minutes at 100 C.  The beeswax will melt. Once it melts make sure that the wrap is completely covered in beeswax.

Remove from the over. You can just hold it from two corners and place it on a piece of oven paper. It’ll dry very quickly.

It’s ready to use.

That simple!

If you omit the resin the wrap isn’t as tacky and doesn’t adjust as well but I don’t find that to be an issue.

To clean, you can use a damp microfiber cloth to wipe it clean.

Notebook cover – video tutorial

Patchwork notebook cover

This tutorial is for a notebook cover that measures 9″ x 15″ but you can make it for any size.

Check out how it’s made.

 

Materials

Fabric

Lining: 1 rectangle 16″ x 10″

Pockets: 4 rectangles 10″ x 5″

Cover: 1 rectangle 16″ x 10″. Mine is made of 3 pieces patched together with the following measurements:

  • 1 rectangle 16″ x 6 1/4″
  • 1 rectangle 16″ x 3 1/2″
  • 1 strip 16″ x 1 1/4″

Fusible interfacing (iron on one side)

  • Lining and cover: 2 rectangle 15″‘ x 10″
  • Pockets: 4 rectangles 10″ x 5″
  • 1 elastic ban (optional)
  • 1 fabric covered button (optional)

Stitch all three rectangles together to make the cover.

Iron with the hems open.

Cut all your other pieces.

Stitch your pockets to make 2 squares. Iron with the hems open.

Fold the cover in two along the long side and make a marking in the middle. Stitch the elastic band where the marking is with the elastic band placed facing inside the fabric (see picture).

Iron the interface to the inside of the fabrics. Getting the interfacing to stick to the fabric when the cover is turned inside out is tricky.

Iron the pocket in half, wrong sides together and pin to the sides of the lining as per the above picture.

Place the cover on top, right sides together, as per the picture.

Pin in place and stitch all around leaving a 4 inch gap to turn the cover inside out.

The corners need to be trimmed after stitching to reduce the bulk after turning inside out.

After turning the cover inside out you end up with a neat cover. The turning is quite tricky because the fusible interface tends to come loose. Pinning it in place temporarily may work.

Try to fit the notebook in the cover now. This may give you an indication of how closely you need to stitch around the cover.

Top stitch around very close to the edge, about 1mm or 2mm depending on how tight you want the cover to fit.

The corners are almost inevitably round unless you have removed much of the fabric on the inside hem.

The book cover is finished.

Place the notebook inside.

Voila!

I used a fabric covered button because I think it looks smart but you could use a plain button. Also, instead of an elastic band you could use a ribbon, in which case it would need to be stitch to both sides of the cover.

Other notebooks

See also the notebook cover PJ did based on this tutorial.

Free silk slippers pattern

These unisex slippers are light weight and not for heavy use. For more regular use silk is not recommended. Also the sole should be made sturdier by using for instance strong 1/4 in thick felt instead of batting.

Materials

  • Scrap fabric for the instep –  I used hand painted silk sateen
  • Scrap fabric for instep lining and sole
  • Batting for sole and instep
  • Imitation leather for sole
  • Matching bias tape

The slippers on the photo are size 38 European (check Wikipedia for a shoe size comparison).

I recommend you test first if the sole and instep will fit your feet. Print, cut around as per instructions on pattern page and place your foot on the sole. There should be ample room on each side of your foot. Place the instep (A) on your foot. Make sure it overflows the sole (B) by 1/2 inch at least all around.

If you have a different shoe size, just use the pattern to make a larger or smaller pattern bearing mind that you should have about 3/4 inch all around both pieces overflowing.

 Instructions

This is the hand painted silk for the insteps.

Instep (A): cut 2 mirror pieces of each the outside fabric, batting and lining.

Sole (B):  cut 2 mirror pieces of the imitation leather, batting and lining.

To make the sole, place the imitation leather wrong side facing up, then a piece of batting and finally the lining piece  right side up. Pin.

For the inset, place the silk fabric right side up, then place the lining right side down, and the batting on top.

Pin.

Stitch the soles at 1/4 in from edge.

Stitch the instep along the top only at 1/4 in from the edge.

Then turn silk piece over and stitch around the instep.

Top and bottom are ready.

Make small cuts as close to the stitching as possible on the curved side of the instep. This will ensure a smooth curve when turned over.

Pin instep to sole really well, particularly around corners.

Stitch at 1/4 in from the edge.

Now add the bias tape.

Stitch bias tape to the sole of the slipper.

Stitch at 1/4 in from the edge from the instep side so that you can see where stitches go and avoid stitching too much into the instep part.

Trim off any bits that stick out.

Now turn over bias, pin and hand stitch using slip stitch and matching thread.

Done!

Hand painted silk slippers pattern

The pattern is by Prudent Baby.

I made a couple of changes. First of all the pattern says it’s for size 9 but when I printed it the sole was a fit for size 7. As a result I didn’t use elastic on the back.

I decided to use hand painted satin silk and needed to add some body to the slippers so I added a layer of batting between the silk and the lining.

I couldn’t find the type of fabric suggested for the sole so I used some imitation leather I had.

I also decorated them with some silk flowers. I have seen this type of flower on the internet before but never tried it. I didn’t follow a tutorial so maybe I did something wrong. I cut some smaller and larger circles and then burned the edges. Since the silk wasn’t synthetic I’m not sure if the burning will keep the silk from fraying for a long time.

I placed the circles together and put some stitches through.

Then I pulled and did a few more stitches to keep the gather in place.

Then I added some sequins and beads in matching colours.

These slippers aren’t for every day use. They look fragile and probably are due to the use of silk but they look cute don’t they?