quilting

Quilting charts, quilting formulas and other quilting online tools

Quilting charts, formulas and other online tools

This list isn’t comprehensive but a collection of some of the most useful quilting charts, formulas and online tools to help you design your quilts. If you know of other tools, charts or formulas please add a comment.

Quilt sizes and quilt backing fabric

Christen from I see stars quilting has put together this fantastic guide to help us work out:

  1. the quilt size you need for a particular mattress size
  2. how much fabric you need and
  3. how to piece it

Not only she has made this chart but she also tells us all about backing your quilt.

Quilt backing fabric chart
Credit: I see stars quilting

Binding calculator

Not a chart but this binding calculator helps you work out how many strips you need for a quilt and how much fabric to buy.

Inches to centimetres conversion

A table but also an online calculator that will convert between inches, yards in decimal form, yards in fractional form, and centimetres.

How many blocks in a quilt

Make Modern Magazine made this very useful chart that shows you how many blocks you need to make a quilt based on block size, with or without sashing.

Precut fabric sizes

Credit: Favequilts
  • Mini charm: 2.5″ x 2.5″ – 6.35cm x 6.35cm
  • Charm squares: 5″ x 5″ – 12.7cm x 12.7cm
  • Jelly roll: 2.5″ x 44″ – 6.35cm x 112c
  • Jolly bar: 5″ x 10″ – 12.7cm x 25.4cm
  • Layer cake: 10″ x 10″ – 25.4cm x 25.4cm
  • Fat eighth: 9″ x 21″ or 11″ x 18″ – 22.86cm x 53.3cm or 28cm x 45.7cm
  • Fat quarter: 18″ x 21″ – 45.7cm x 53.3cm
  • Half yard: 18″ x 44″ – 45.7cm x 112cm
  • One yard: 36″ x 44″ – 91.4cm x 112cm

There’re many ways to use precuts.

Some patterns are written for precuts white others, particularly the larger precuts, often are cut into smaller sizes.

Most often it’s fat quarters. Patchwork posse has a very good article on cutting a fat quarter into different sizes with different options.

Also this chart shows you how many squares of a particular size you can cut from a fat quarter.

Credit: Favequilts

and laye cakes:

Credit: Ashton Bynum of Bright Linen

Traditional half square triangle (HST) method chart

This is the two at a time method demonstrated on video:

I refer to Blossom heart quilts chart frequently to work out my HSTs:

Credit: Blossom heart quilts

Flying geese chart and formula

This is a video demo of the no waste flying geese. Use the formula below to make the block in different sizes.

Credit: Ellisa Higgs

Courthouse steps or log cabin yardage requirements

This extremely useful chart is for a number of block sizes.

But first watch a short demonstration of this block:

Credit: Landauer Publishing via Pinterest

Half log cabin blocks

Watch my video demo for this block:

Credit: Landauer Publishing via Pinterest

Quarter square triangles chart

This video demonstrates how to make a quarter square triangle. Use the formula below to make the block in different sizes and check Bonjour quilts post for more information on the formula.

Credit: Bonjour quilts

Set in and corner triangles

This chart is very handy when making a quilt on point.

Credit: CT Publishing

But what’s an on point quilt?

An on point quilt is assembled in diagonal rows.
Each diagonal row starts and ends with either a corner setting triangle or a side setting triangle.

Julie Baird of Generations quilt patterns has a good in depth explanation on setting triangles for an on-point quilt.

And last but not least…

I wanted to share this very special PDF of charts by Deborah Paul that she compiled herself and shared with us. This may be useful as one pager to have handy when working out a design.

Do you wish to receive my tutorials in your inbox?

Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there


My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

This post has affiliate links.

13 comments

  1. WOW….there is so much great information in this email.

    Thank you  so much Teresa!!   BTW….I love watching your videos and
    often end up taking screen shots to keep as inspirations for future
    projects!!!

    Were are you in Australia?   My husband and I spent 6 years in Canberra
    way back in the 1980’s….he did his PhD at Australian National
    University.  It was a great experience for us and we have so many
    wonderful memories of the people there!!

    Cheers….

    Frances

    http://www.francesquilts.com

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Very useful. Thank you for this free information. I watch most of you videos. Not all because I want to use your techniques. Cathy/USA

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Teresa, I love your emails so much. I have a folder labeled SEWN UP. Today’s email is a really loaded email. Loaded with so much great information and your patterns. I also have your book. I look forward to seeing your emails everyday. Thanks from Lil in Michigan

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you!  This email made my day! Such good and helpful info. Again, thank you Ellie Guhl

    Sent from AT&T Yahoo Mail for iPhone

    Liked by 1 person

  5. WOW! WOW! WOW! Teresa !!!…THANK YOU SO MUCH!….what a great help this is! (((((((((((((((((hugs))))))))))))))))) Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

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