quilting

French cuisine tea towel embroidery tutorial and free download

Kitchen towel size

32” x 22 1/2”. For a different towel size scale the printout.

Embroidery

The embroidery stitch for the lettering is stem stitch (stem stitch video tutorial – link will open in another window)

Download templates

The download files print as 3 separate pages that need to be trimmed and taped. You can resize the printout if your tea towel is smaller.

Align the text well and tape together.

Trace the text on white cotton fabric.

Size of embroidery when printed at 100%: 25 1/2” x 8”.

Important: There is a spelling mistake on my embroidery (île flottante is supposed to have a double t). This has been corrected in the download.

Floral bottom strip

Cut a strip 25 1/2” x 5”. Pin to the embroidery.

Red strip

Cut a red strip 25 1/2” x 1 1/2”. Pin to the embroidery.

Stitch both strips and place over the kitchen towel.

Iron with the seams open.

Placing the embroidery panel on the kitchen towel

First make a small 1/4” fold on each side of the panel and iron well.

To place the panel, fold the floral fabric in two, align the folded edge of the floral fabric with the edge of the tea towel and pin to the tea towel. This will make the tea towel longer by 2” or so.

The shorter sides need to be folded in as well to match the width of the kitchen towel before you fold the floral fabric over (see picture).

Stitch on the seam line between the embroidery and the floral fabric and then again at the very edge of the red strip.

Do you wish to receive my tutorials in your inbox?

Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there


My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

1 comment

  1. Good Morning, Teresa! Your work is beautiful and your post inspires me. I need a few new towels. Guess I better get busy!

    Used to be, that young ladies all made these kitchen towels for practice in stitching, and also “For their future”. It gained them sewing skill and gave them a useful end product for their kitchens. I have many of these lovely old linen towels that were made by my husband’s grandmother and great grandmother. They had been kept out of use because of their “precious” status. I began using them in my kitchen (sans starching!!!) many years ago, and they sure have held up!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: