Lily quilt block – On point quilt series – video tutorial

An on point quilt is assembled in diagonal rows.
Each diagonal row starts and ends with either a corner setting triangle or a side setting triangle.

Julie Baird of Generations quilt patterns has a good in depth explanation on setting triangles for an on-point quilt.

So now let’s learn to sew a lily quilt block.


My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

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Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there

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Lily block - on point quilt series video tutorial

Three beautiful English Paper Piecing (EPP) projects – video tutorial

I find hand sewing very relaxing so I always have a project or two of English Paper Piecing (EPP) on the go.

These three projects are very easy to make and they’re perfect to use your small fabric scraps.

Download template

What paper to use?

I print my EPP shapes on cardstock.

My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

Do you wish to receive my tutorials in your inbox?

Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there
Three beautiful English Paper Piecing (EPP) projects video tutorial

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Hearts and Stars miniature quilt pattern

Today I’m releasing a miniature medallion quilt pattern called Hearts and Stars.

The quilt is not even 20″ x 20″.

How did I make it? I made the 2 1/2″ with foundation freezer paper.

Learn paper piecing with freezer paper with this very easy heart block.

You can download the hearts and stars miniature heart (pdf) sample block for free and give it a go and then decide whether you could make the full quilt with this technique.

Hearts and Stars miniature quilt pattern

This is a digital download for a miniature quilt pattern.

Quilt size: 19 3/4″ x 19 3/4″.

Finished block size: 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″.

Quilt style: on point miniature quilt.

Level: confident beginner / intermediate.

Technique: foundation piecing with freezer paper for blocks

When making very small blocks I find the sewing is far more accurate when doing foundation paper piecing.

And I really enjoy using freezer paper for foundation piecing because there’s no need to tear the paper at the end plus you can reuse the templates over and over.

In addition you can directly print the templates on to freezer paper for printing or trace the templates on to freezer paper on a roll.

Or you may want to use freezer paper on a roll to print by ironing the freezer paper to copy paper and then print on it. Don’t press for too long. The first time I tried the freezer paper bonded so strongly with the copy paper I couldn’t remove it after printing.

What’s in the pattern?

– block foundation piecing templates
– cutting instructions for all pieces
– colour schemes recommendation
– quilt assembly instructions
– quilt colouring page
– several video tutorials on foundation piecing and binding – an internet connection is required.

Hearts and stars miniature quilt pattern

Choosing fabric and machine binding video tutorial – Quilting in 2021

As part of the series Quilting in 2021, today’s tutorial focuses on the very start of a project, choosing fabrics, and the finishing of a quilt: binding by machine.

Choosing fabrics is one of the things I like most about quilting.

I’ll share some of the ways I go about choosing my fabrics for any particular project.

There’re many ways to choose fabrics that will go well together but let’s just focus on 3 simple ways to find matching fabrics.

To recap:

1. Use fabrics from one single fabric collection

Usually fabrics in the same collection go well together.

2. Using the fabric colour palette

Use the palette to choose the rest of the fabrics that’ll will go well together.

Get a busy print for instance and then match the other fabrics around it.

To match the secondary fabrics try to use tone on tone, solids or less busy fabric. This will ensure that the match is more harmonious.

What about the background fabric?

The majority of the quilts I make have a unifying background fabric.

My favourite colours for the background fabric are whites and creams.

The reason I like whites and creams best is that they add “breathing space” to the quilt as well as making the design pop up.

Black is another good background colour that achieves similar effects to using white or creams.

Applications that help you select a colour scheme

One of my favourite colour tools is Adobe Color. In this application you can create your colour scheme from scratch or upload an image you like and get a colour scheme based on the image colours. It’s a lot of fun to play with it!

Still can’t decide on a fabric collection?

Some of my favourite designers are Heather Bailey, Bonnie and Camille, Valori Wells,  Jocelyn Proust, just from the top of my head.


My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

Do you wish to receive my tutorials in your inbox?

Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there
Binding and choosing fabrics for a quilt project

Spring is here miniature quilt – video tutorial

If you purchased my brooch templates, here’s a quilt you can make with them!

The finished block is 2″ X 2”.

The finished quilt is 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″.

This video demonstrates how to put your blocks together into a cute miniature quilt the size of a large block.

Buy the full 18 template set

2" quilted brooches video tutorial

Get the templates to make 16 blocks to make the quilt. The set also includes 2 Halloween blocks I didn’t use for the quilt.

1 1/2″ x 1 1/2″ quilt blocks template set

If you like miniature blocks, look at my 1 1/2″ quilt magnets set

Quilt magnets video tutorial

Get the templates

Get the templates to make 18 fridge magnets or a mini quilt.


Or maybe you’d rather make slightly bigger blocks but still quite small. Check out my 3″ quilt block set.

Tiny quilt templates

Download the traditional and foundation  templates from my Etsy shop.


My book Turnabout Patchwork

“Turnabout Patchwork. Simple quilts with a twist” is all about playing with blocks – making a block, slicing it up, and turning or repositioning the pieces to make a completely different block (sometimes two smaller blocks) to yield endless quilt tops.

See all the quilts in the book in a real life project

Do you wish to receive my tutorials in your inbox?

Share your work!

If you make any of my tutorials this is how you can share your pictures:

  • On Instagram please tag me with @teresadownunder and hashtag #teresadownunder
  • Join my Facebook group and post your pictures there
Spring is here miniature quilt

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